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20111001
20111031
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 27
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)
about what can and should be done. we are glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and brought to you by the aarp foundation. >> wk kellogg foundation. improving the lives of a vulnerable children. wkkf.org. >> of the annie e. casey foundation, helping build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: even before the name -- numbers came out, we decided to spend some time getting to know the people behind the pottering -- poverty statistics. cornel west joined us. in tonight's episode, we call this one suffering, we look at what
called "reimagining equality." we are glad you can join us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: and the cahill is a professor for social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis. she was employed at the eeoc. that led to her testimony on the supreme court confirmation hearings of clarence thomas 20 years ago. her newest book is called "reimagining equality, stories of gender, race, and finding home." good to have you back on this program. we were talking before you came on the air. with the advent of the internet and 24 hour cable
is here. he is out in a timely film about wall street called "margin call ." we are glad you joined us. coming up, right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: alfredo quinones- hinojosa is a renowned neurosurgeon and director of the pituitary tumor center at johns hopkins. his remarkable path from mexico to the united states is the subject of a new memoir, "becoming dr. q: my journey from migrant farm worker to brain surgeon." an honor to have you on this program. i just want to touch this hand. >> i am hon
. >> a lot of us hoped it was going to be a different kind of president. perhaps because he looked and talks like a different president, but for two years i was at scheduling secretary for u.s. senator alan cranston. working in the internal gears of the democratic party, i got to see what a huge influence money has. there is this nexus of moneyed interests and political power that has swallowed our society hold. the people who pay for it are the people on the bottom rungs of the latter. that is why you see these austerity measures across europe causing such conflagrations from greece to spain to madison, wisconsin. tavis: what do these kinds of songs do? what do they put out in the universe in troubled times like these? >> growing up, music was something that really steeled my backbone for the struggles in my life around issues of race and class. i think they can do the same things now. in our country, there has never been a successful, progressive struggle that did not have a sound track. whether the civil rights movement, workers' rights, women's rights, there have to be songs at the barri
live at or below the poverty line, and i will be joined by vicki escarra . we thank you for joining us on night two of the poverty tour. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. one last place to gether with your community. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley, and works to improve financial literacy one question at a time. >> brought to you by the aarp foundation. ♪ >> the w.k. kellogg foundation, improving the lives of vulnerable children. learn more at wkkf.org. ♪ >> helping to build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. ♪ tavis: in our second part of the poverty tour, we look at the inw pour,or," who used to be the middle class. >> the blues are a personal catastrophe expressed lyrically. >> the white literary blues. >> i teach them in my class. >> the tennessee williams festival. >> me and my wife -- all of us. trying to get here. you have to keep our home. >> the new pouor are the form er middle class. >> i had a job, a family, what people are supposed to have. i have nothin
in america starting monday october 10. we will bring you five nights of our travels around the u.s. it is called the poverty tour. all next week will introduce you to the new face of a poor and feature conversations with leaders including kathleen sebelius, jeffrey sachs, a and cornell west among others. we are glad you joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: when her homeland became torn apart by rebels, she decided to fight back. she cursed and empowered women to fight for peace and a new era of stability in the country. a new memoir about it is ca
did. he was almost like a presentation card. when i used to go to studios for auditions, and they said to me, "what have you done," he was the guy, pedro almodovar. he opened the door for me to have access to places i probably would not have. tavis: unpacked this for me. what is happening or not happening in your life for now that makes you want to return to him to break all the rules? >> maybe because i have been working in the united states for 21 years. in a way, i am kind of handicap here to a very strict number of characters that can be offered to me. you had the feeling when i came to this country 21 years ago that i could not speak the language of all. i did "the mambo kings" but speaking a language. i learned the lines unethically. i have an interpreter to understand what i was hearing from my director. in a box, in a way. that allows me to play a specific number of characters with a specific number of directors. i have done a lot of epics, mainly spanish characters, which i absolutely prefer, because i am proud of my heritage and community. but at this point, you want to do so
is the responsibility of movemes, not one person, you know, if you are sitting in the oval office an those who are used to having the ear of the most powerful person on earth are whispering in his ear if he can't point ou the oice window of the oval office and say, if i do that, they will storm the bastille, if there is no one out there he is in big trouble and sometimes he may not want anyone out there but it sure looks like the crowds are gathering. her informed, they are concerned, and they are determined. >> fund forget charlie rose has been provided by the coca-cola compy, supporting this program since 02. and americ express. additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news an information services worldwide. > be more. tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. first up tonight a conversation with "new york times" excessive editor jill abramson. her thoughts tonight on a very busy last several days in the news business and her new book "the puppy diaries." and also john carlos. his defiant salute at the 1968 summer olympics. he is out
have joined us. "new york times" excessive editor and olympian john carlos coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] tavis: a few quick programming notes. first tonight, some terrific conversations coming up tonight and all this week. tomorrow night nile rogers is here. a conversation with anita hill. hard to believe it has been 20 years since the scandal that propelled her into the public eye and jerry west on thursday and friday jackie collins. tonight, though, we are pleased to kick off this week with jill abramson. las
. we're glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. >> and by viewers like you. if thank you. kcet public television] tavis: pleased to welcome martin sheen and emilio west of as to the program. the way, a movie written and directed by emilio, here are some scenes from "the way." >> are they going to change your life? >> something like that. ♪ >> i am so sorry, i had no idea. >> those are smart, confident, stubborn. >> a lot like you. tavis: take me back when you started writing the project and you know you are writing this specifically for your father. what is that process like? >> i wanted to write something that explored who he is as a man
, jeffrey sachs. we are glad you joined us tonight for part for our party tore here on pbs, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> brought to you by the aarp foundation. w. k. kellogg foundation, engaging communities to improve the lives of local children. learn more at wkkf.org. >> the annie e. casey foundation, helping to build better future for american kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: despite all the talk in washington from both sides of the aisle, democrats and republicans, about the importance of jobs,
have been doing that, god has been helping us to educate people who have never been poor but they find themselves poor. >> we see these groups working together and we see how they are fighting for things and we can see how these social movements are growing up. >> the effort to end poverty are all of the coalition's and organizations fighting for the plight of the poor. that is the basis why we are on this journey to eliminate poverty. >> the united states must take it upon ourselves to enforce our human-rights. >> changing power structures that really keep a lot of us port generation after generation. -- keep a lot of us poor generation after generation. >> you have to have people that respect people and left people enough to spite. tavis: our poverty tour ended in memphis, tennessee where dr. king lost his life. he had launched the poor people's campaign which brought people from all races across the country together to demand an economic bill of rights. >> something is happening in america. there is a direct connection between the warehouse workers and the poverty tour. this is happ
said, who should we get to work with us? they all start toi called it j'. the and the last part of the puzzle was damian marley. and we wanted to have this jamaican feeling but with somebody who is a great lyricist and a thinking person and that would fit with all of this experimental music. damian is great at it fermenting with different sounds like "welcome to jamrock." here is a brilliant lyricists. tavis: what makes you know or believe that, you could throw stuff in a pot in college gumbo. how do you know it is going to work? >> the roots of all lot of these sounds, there has to be a common denominator. blues is often a common denominator. in asian music, it can sound similar to blues music. then the feeling of jamaican rhythms can also work with a blues feeling on top. i have done experiments in the past where i made a rhythmic track and then played blues on top of it. so i knew there was a rough semblance of possibilities that might work. as my old solicitor and used to say, when i got well check could not believe it. i said, are you sure kumbaya car? he would say you have
that is something in all of us. i wanted to create that character that is a lot of people and look at the historical comparisons between the 1929 into the depression and what we have now. tavis: tell me more about the woman. >> she is an immigrant like so many of us are. she came from russia and she lived in a fifth floor walk up in the lower east side and the late 20's. she is trying to find herself. she comes up with a job at a diner and she comes into contact with the banker types that usually don't come to her neighborhood. they still don't come today. she very much just wants to make something out of herself and tries through her connection with a banker, looks at him as a person, not just as a person. she discovers a lot of shady things going on at the time. she also has a tradition towards our family and coming home and seeing the poverty on the streets and seeing the pushcart operators not able to sell their wares. she is trying to come to terms as a person. tavis: i had a chance to go through this. i don't think this story could not have been told is wonderfully as you told it had the chara
impact on all citizens. we're glad you have joined us on 93 that we have devoted to party in america coming up right -- on night 3 that we have devoted to poverty in america coming up right now. >> it is not just a street or a boulevard, but a place where one stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance has joined tavis smiley to improve literacy, remove obstacles to economic empowerment. >> brought to you by the aarp foundation. ♪ >> w. k. kellogg foundation, engaging committees to improve the lives of vulnerable children. -- engaging communities to improve the lives of vulnerable children. ♪ >> the and the tk foundation, helping to build their futures for kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: at the heart of somerset has gone wrong with our economy in the past few years is the problems in housing. we are looking at those caught up in the housing crisis in a piece called no room at the inn
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)

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